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simes, president of the center for the national interest, a foreign policy think tank. and steven heydemann, a senior adviser for middle east initiatives at the united states institute of peace. he's worked with the syrian opposition on the challenges ahead once the assad regime falls. steve, to you first. what do you understand the situation on the ground to be right now in syria? >> we have seen in the past month a significant shift in the momentum of events on the ground. we have seen the opposition increase the effectiveness of its tactics. it has acquired weapons that have permitted it to challenge the regime much more effectively across a broad range of fronts ranging from the south of syria to damascus to the north, and we're seeing this reflected in the regime's response to the opposition including some of the activities surrounding movement of chemical weapons. we don't know exactly what's at stake but part of the speculation is that they're putting themselves into a position in which they could create a defensive zone if it turns out to they're unable to defend damascus
cuba has been essentially stagnant. the core element of our policy, our foreign policy, which is the embargo, has authorized in a proclamation signed by president kennedy on february 3, 1962. that's 51 years ago. at that time, president kennedy justified the embargo by citing the -- quote -- "subversive, offensive of sino-soviet communism with which the government of cuba is publicly aligned." end quote. he also stated his willingness to -- quote -- "take all action necessary to promote national and hemispheric security by isolating the present government of cuba and thereby reducing the threat posed by its alignment with these communist powers." it's an understatement to say that president kennedy's rationale is from a different era. the cold war is over. the, quote -- "subversive offensive of sino-soviet communism has been turned back, and what remains of the communist powers that he was referring to are now our major trading partners. we have now extended permanent normal trade relations to russia. this was, of course, the principal communist power to which president kenn
the lugar energy initiative, he has combined his foreign policy and agricultural expertise to promote policies to spur economic growth. mr. president, in the dark days following the attacks of september 11, 2001, senator lugar set forth a set of principles to guide our nation in these difficult times. the lugar doctrine calls upon the united states to use all of its military, diplomatic, and economic power without question to ensure that life-threatening weapons of mass destruction everywhere are accounted, contained, and hopefully destroyed. end quote. in addition, the lugar doctrine asserts that america should encourage democratic institutions and decrease reliance on foreign energy sources. these accomplishments and so many more stem from a profound intellect combined with characteristic. there's nothing i love more than to hear dick lugar give a tutorial on any country in the world, and he can do so; he can talk knowledgeably and teach us about any country in the world. that is the depth of his experience, his knowledge, his expertise. dick has also always been a voice of reason i
. what can our current president of the united states learn from churchhill's foreign policy? >> one thing churchhill would not believe in leading from behind. he believed in telling the facts and then rallying the people around the facts. >> steve: yeah. >> and what he can learn in this book, not only his many prophecies was proved to be true. but that the way he arrived at these predictions. that process is a premer for presidential leadership. >> steve: you think that it a big mistake for president obama in his first term to return that famous bust of churchhill to the british and took it out of the white house. >> well he did it, yes. when it went there the night before. yes, he was awful rejecting the wisdom of churchhill he could listen to churchhill he would say the important thing is not to be popular, but to be respected. and churchhill did that. he told the people the truth. that's the reason he was a great prophet not only did he know history but he had the courage to deliver the unvarnished facts unlike spineless politician or burrcrats. >> steve: maybe the president coul
. like, you can't do it all. we had an atlantic cover story weaselly that wasn't about foreign policy. the title was why women still can't have it all. but it does -- can america still have it all? and in the way, has framed that, the answer is no, that there are limits. >> steve, even as we rebalanced to the asia-pacific we have continued are deep engagement with the region, other countries just as if, there's one example in our defense strategic guidance put out in january talked about having to become a net provider of security. i think you see that over the last couple of decades, and you see ongoing today. we will continue to be engaged in a obvious of the middle east and north africa and globally. the united states is a global power. it is not a zero-sum game, particularly when you look at the importance of alliances and partnerships, both within the asia-pacific and globally. our objective is to continue to strengthen those alliances and partnerships, and if we, if i can pivot to the topic of china, to build on the areas of cooperation that we have across the border, including
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)